Sep 082012
 

Spring Creek Road, which runs from Killarney over the range down to the Head, has some great spots for not only wildlife watching but also magnificent natural scenery. Along this road there are Brown’s Falls, Dagg’s Falls, Queen Mary Falls, Carr’s Lookout and Teviott Falls. But perhaps most importantly from a conservation viewpoint, there is the Carabeen Nature Refuge. This patch of rainforest between Queen Mary Falls and Carr’s Lookout is home to one of the rarest Australian birds, the Albert’s Lyrebird. That this strip of natural forest remains is the testimony of an environmentally aware property owner who recognised how important this piece of land on her property was. She protected it and then bequeathed in trust to the Queensland Government for conservation status, and any future owners of the land will need to bide by her arrangement. Surrounded by pastureland, this strip of rainforest is home to many uncommon and rare creatures. I have driven through it many times and seen the iconic Albert’s Lyrebirds and Red-necked Pademelons that are relatively common here. But lots of other hard-to-see species are also active here. So even though I wasn’t really equipped to photograph in this extremely dark environment, I rather optimistically set out before dawn and found a quiet piece of road where I could park the truck and get fairly unobstructed views in both directions. I managed to get very poor images of a female Albert’s Lyrebird, Australian Logrunner and Red-necked Pademelon……this is definitely territory for a 300/2.8, not a 70-300/4-5.6!

Albert's Lyrebird (female)

Albert’s Lyrebird (female)

Australian Logrunner

Australian Logrunner

Red-necked Pademelon

Red-necked Pademelon

Aug 262012
 

Early one morning during my Australian trip I headed out along the Condamine River to a quiet spot that I had noticed on a previous excursion. Here the river widened around a bend, forming a slow-flowing, lagoon-like stretch of water that had reeds and grasses along its edges. When I first saw this part of the river, I immediately thought it might be a good spot to look for the shy and secretive Platypus – a species that I had not observed before in the wild.

Platypus

A head-on shot of a Platypus swimming slowly along the bank of the Condamine River.

The Platypus is a unique creature, and one of only five monotremes – mammals that lay eggs rather than giving birth to live offspring. It is also unique in that it is the only venomous mammal, with the male having spurs on its hind feet that can administer a very nasty dose of toxin that is very painful even to humans. This creature is additionally semi-aquatic, and its combination of duck-bill, paddle-tail and webbed feet make it one of the most unusual animals on the planet.

Platypus

A Platypus slowly swimming mid-stream in the upper reaches of the Condamine River.

Notoriously shy, the Platypus is usually never seen by people even though it may be quite common in suitable habitat within its range. It is normally active at dawn and dusk, or nocturnally or on overcast days. However, during the cold winter months they need to feed all day to get the energy intake they require to maintain their body temperature (even though it is lower than most mammals in cold conditions, with the Platypus being endothermic), so this is the best time to try and locate and photograph them. Even so, their habitat is usually well shaded and they are almost always in motion, so taking any kind of acceptable image of a Platypus is very rewarding as slow shutter speeds and high ISOs create very limiting parameters. And I had to hand-hold the camera as I didn’t bring my tripod with me on this trip!

Platypus

A Platypus broaching the surface of the Condamine River.

This particular morning was fine but foggy and frosty. Despite the murkiness, soon after quietly approaching the river I spotted one Platypus floating on the water surface directly beneath where I was standing on the bank! It was as surprised as I was, but didn’t panic – it just slowly submerged and swam underwater toward the opposite bank. So I waited patiently and after about 10 minutes it reappeared on the surface not too far away and I was able to take some images as the sunlight began to penetrate the mist. I noticed its mate feeding further upstream, so after taking my photos I just sat there watching the pair for an hour or so as they went about their early morning breakfast activities. It was quite a privilege to observe them alone at such close range and in a magnificent setting – definitely one of the highlights of this trip!

Dec 042011
 

I revisited the Queen Mary Falls area the next morning, again very early as I didn’t have much time on this day. My main focus was to photograph the male Satin Bowerbird in his bower, plus to walk the trail down to the foot of the falls and capture anything interesting. Also, I removed the 1.4x TC and just used the 300/2.8 at its native focal length, which gave me an extra stop of light as well as better resolution. After a couple of hours at Queen Mary Falls, I stopped briefly at Daggs Falls on the way back to my parents’ place. Then, on the way back to the Gold Coast, I paused at a lookout and took a shot of the Head, an iconic mountain near Boonah.

Queen Mary Falls

Queen Mary Falls

Daggs Falls

Daggs Falls

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Black-shouldered Kite being attacked by Willie Wagtail

Black-shouldered Kite being attacked by Willie Wagtail

Bell Miner

Bell Miner

Brown Thornbill

Brown Thornbill

Collared Sparrowhawk

Collared Sparrowhawk

Collared Sparrowhawk

Collared Sparrowhawk

Collared Sparrowhawk

Collared Sparrowhawk

Eastern Spinebill

Eastern Spinebill

Fan-tailed Cuckoo

Fan-tailed Cuckoo

Spotted Pardalote (male)

Spotted Pardalote (male)

Superb Fairy-wren (male)

Superb Fairy-wren (male)

Buff-banded Rail

Buff-banded Rail

Swamp Wallaby

Swamp Wallaby

Grey Kangaroo

Grey Kangaroo

Eastern Water Dragon

Eastern Water Dragon

The Head

The Head

Dec 042011
 

In the early morning I went up to Queen Mary Falls, which is in the southern section of the Main Range National Park. Weather was better, but mainly cloudy at first, so high ISOs were the order for the initial part of the morning. I hadn’t taken a tripod, so all shots were handheld and at pretty slow shutter speeds. The weather improved later, and I was able to get some better shots of some bird species.

European Hare

European Hare

Wonga Pigeon

Wonga Pigeon

Eastern Spinebill

Eastern Spinebill

White-browed Scrubwren

White-browed Scrubwren

Superb Fairy-wren (male)

Superb Fairy-wren (male)

Superb Fairy-wren (male)

Superb Fairy-wren (male)

Superb Fairy-wren (male)

Superb Fairy-wren (male)

Superb Fairy-wren (female)

Superb Fairy-wren (female)

 

Red Wattlebird

Red Wattlebird

Laughing Kookaburra

Laughing Kookaburra

Laughing Kookaburra with Swamp Rat

Laughing Kookaburra with Swamp Rat

Eastern Yellow Robin

Eastern Yellow Robin

 

Eastern Yellow Robin

Eastern Yellow Robin

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (male)

Satin Bowerbird (female)

Satin Bowerbird (female)

Satin Bowerbird (female)

Satin Bowerbird (female)

Satin Bowerbird (female)

Satin Bowerbird (female)

Crimson Rosella (adult)

Crimson Rosella (adult)

Crimson Rosella (juvenile)

Crimson Rosella (juvenile)

Eastern Rosella

Eastern Rosella

King Parrot (male)

King Parrot (male)

King Parrot (male)

King Parrot (male)

King Parrot (female)

King Parrot (female)

Little Corella

Little Corella

Rainbow Lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeet

Galah

Galah

Straw-necked Ibis

Straw-necked Ibis

Black-faced Monarch

Black-faced Monarch